The Unifying Principle for Creating Training Trajectories for Athletes

Athletes come in many shapes and sizes, and have very different needs for their sport performance. The amount of ground interaction is the defining characteristic that differentiates different kinds of athletes. Ground is anything external to the athlete that can be touched and pushed on. Ground itself ranges on a continuum between most easily deformable and least deformable. The more external ground that is hard to deform, the more grounded the activity. Low ground interaction athletes like divers, half pipe skaters and snowboarders typically display lower body masses, and rely on rotation and tumbling to dominate in their sport. High interaction ground athletes like power lifters and interior linemen have greater body masses, and rely on not being rotated or tumbled to dominate in their sport. This presentation will highlight the primary avenues of providing ground in training exercises, determining how much ground to provide different kinds of athletes in their training, and how to progress them once you've reached a good ground correspondence with training matching sport ground demands.

Athletes come in many shapes and sizes, and have very different needs for their sport performance. The amount of ground interaction is the defining characteristic that differentiates different kinds of athletes. Ground is anything external to the athlete that can be touched and pushed on. Ground itself ranges on a continuum between most easily deformable and least deformable. The more external ground that is hard to deform, the more grounded the activity. Low ground interaction athletes like divers, half pipe skaters and snowboarders typically display lower body masses, and rely on rotation and tumbling to dominate in their sport. High interaction ground athletes like power lifters and interior linemen have greater body masses, and rely on not being rotated or tumbled to dominate in their sport. This presentation will highlight the primary avenues of providing ground in training exercises, determining how much ground to provide different kinds of athletes in their training, and how to progress them once you've reached a good ground correspondence with training matching sport ground demands. 

Biography

​​Pat Davidson, Ph.D., is an independent trainer, consultant, author, and lecturer in NYC. Pat is the former Director of Training Methodology and Continuing Education for Peak Performance, and former Professor of Exercise Science at Springfield College and Brooklyn College. Pat is also a former 175-pound strongman competitor who finished in the top 10 in the U.S. twice, competed in two World Championships, and finished in the top 10 in the world once. Pat is interested in all realms of human organism improvement, and is relentless in pursuing education.

​​Pat Davidson, Ph.D., is an independent trainer, consultant, author, and lecturer in NYC. Pat is the former Director of Training Methodology and Continuing Education for Peak Performance, and former Professor of Exercise Science at Springfield College and Brooklyn College. Pat is also a former 175-pound strongman competitor who finished in the top 10 in the U.S. twice, competed in two World Championships, and finished in the top 10 in the world once. Pat is interested in all realms of human organism improvement, and is relentless in pursuing education.

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